Get a site
Hiking between Marana and Montefalcone

Hiking between Marana and Montefalcone

Hiking between

Marana and Montefalcone

among clouds and nature

Last Sunday I went hiking with my brother on the mountains not far from home.

Wanted to go to Cima Marana how we often do during the year, but instead of taking one of the most common paths, those starting from Contrada Gebbani (or Castagna) and going up directly to Cima Marana, we chose Sentiero 203, that from Gebbani goes to Malga Casoline and ends at the dirty road that goes from Piatta di Montefalcone.

The sentiero 203

Taking the path that starts between the Gebbani and Castagna contrade that goes directly up to Cima Marana (the path we call “of the ridge”), not far from the departure point there’s fork: to the left you go to the Marana peak, to the right you go to Malga Casoline, that is Path no. 203.

Here we were close to Malga Casoline, at about one hour from departure.

The 203 is longer and a bit harder than the other paths that go to Cima Marana, but it’s almost entirely in the shade and it crosses a beautiful forest.

Passo della Porta

After about 2 hours of hiking (consider that I’m not very fit), we got to Passo della Porta, along the dirty road that connects Campodavanti to Montefalcone.

Instead of walking on the road to go to Montefalcone, we decided to walk on the ridge. 

But on the other side of the mountain there was quite some fog, adn we could see nothing.

The view from up there is amazing.

I know because I took the same path one year ago, in a nice sunny day.

That is why I am showing you here the pictures I too one year ago. 

The ridge one year ago

You can see the Carega peak and Rifugio Fraccaroli from up there, if it’s not foggy or raining.

Towards Montefalcone

It might have been foggy, but I managed to find some pretty cute things that deserved a photograph. 

And finally, the Rifugio Montefalcone

It took us more than half an hour to get to the lodge from Passo della Porta, partly because I was starting to feel tired and the ridge has some pretty hard climbs, partly because I was taking pictures on the way. 

Lunch at Rifugio Montefalcone with minestrone soup and red fruits strudel 🙂

Towards Cima Marana

After a short siesta we left for Cima Marana.

Again, beautiful landscape and nature, despite the fog. 

what about these roots???

Cima Marana is one of the southernmost peaks of the Dolomites, and one of the lowest.

At 1554 meters above sea level, it has a special view of the Chiampo and Agno valleys and you can even see the Garda Lake and Venice Lagoon on bright clear days.

It’s a shame there’s always someone who leaves some garbage behind. 

I collected 5 cigarette butts, only around the cross of Cima Marana.

 

The descent towards the Gebbani was a bit hard for me, I was feeling more and more tired and my knees were starting to ache. 

but I love this itinerary so much, I’m looking forward to the next time!

It’s Going to be Perfect!

vieni con me!

My not so happy experience on the Floating Piers

My not so happy experience on the Floating Piers

My experience on the Floating Piers on Lake Iseo was not the happiest. It was very tiring and a bit unsuccessful.

The Floating Piers is a work by the Bulgarian-American artist Christo on Lake Iseo. It consists in 3 kilometers of polyethylene boardwalk (covered in a yellow tissue) that connects Sulzano, a small village on the shores of the lake, to Monte Isola and another small and private island. The work of art is free, open to public and walkable for about 2 weeks, from June 18th to July 3rd, 2016.

floating piers
Peschiera Maraglio on Monte Isola

I went there yesterday, Wednesday, in the afternoon, because I was told that it’s less crowded in the afternoon and on weekdays. Yesterday it was not. It was crazy. We could tell it from the traffic on the road to get to the Lake. From home it took us three hours instead of two. You can’t drive into Sulzano, from where the Floating Piers start, which is a very small village and couldn’t welcome all the people flocking to the work of art. So there are other options to get there: you can either drive or take a train to one of the other villages around the lake and from there take a bus, a ferry or a train to Sulzano or Monte Isola. But none of those ways of transport is simple (or guarantee you will be able to get to the Floating Piers); most ferries are booked, buses are slow, trains are irregular. We went to Marone, north of Sulzano, because I was told that from the northern part of the lake it’s easier to get to Sulzano than from Iseo, in the South, where most people go. Still, we had to wait for one hour for the train from Marone to Sulzano, because Sulzano was congested, and people were not allowed in for some time. Once we got to Sulzano, the situation was even worse. We had to queue for almost 3 hours before we could get onto the boardwalk. I admired all those kids that queued with us, they were very brave.

While on the queue, we heard some people that left Bologna at 7 am; they were queuing with us at 9 pm because once in Brescia they were told that Sulzano was closed. They had to wait various hours in Brescia before they could come to the lake.

floating piers
A crowded and yellow Sulzano

We got onto the Floating Piers at 9.30 pm. And we could only stay for about 10 minutes, because it was late and probably the last train back to Marone was at 10.20 pm. I say “probably” because nothing seemed to be clear and certain. On the timetable at the station the last train was specified at 10.20, but the lady that sold us the tickets said the last train was at midnight. To be on the safe side, and not to have to walk 1 hour and a half back, we decided to take the train earlier. And anyway we had 2 more hours drive to go home, it was getting really late.

It was nice to walk on the Floating Piers. Nothing really exciting though; I think most people like the idea of being part of something that has been publicized so much. I like that you can walk to an island when normally you can only take a ferry there. But I would have liked to enjoy it for longer; the plan was to be there by 5 or max 6 pm, and walk a couple of hours.

Floating Piers Iseo Lake
10 minutes on the Floating Piers

Why are the Floating Piers so popular? Or crowded? Probably if they were there for more than 2 weeks, the visits wouldn’t be so concentrated. So, why is it available only for 2 weeks? Is it because it needs lots of maintenance? Or because the holiday season has started and the hotels by the lake need some quiet for their guests? I don’t know.

Anyway, I have just checked the live camera of the square in front of the city hall where we spent 2 hours yesterday, and there’s no queue at all today. So I was really unlucky. And I’m even more upset. I wish I had gone today instead. What I complain about is that there was not enough information. Yesterday, in the morning, before we started our trip to Sulzano, I checked the official website of the Floating Piers; there’s a “news” section and the last news was from June 25th (yesterday it was the 29th); no news about a congestion in town, so I thought that everything was fine. If I had been advised that it was particularly crowded, I wouldn’t have gone and like me I think many people. Probably not those that left at 7 am to get there, but those living a bit closer like me, I’m sure they would have preferred to go today and spend less time on a queue.

I also lament that after so many hours of queue you still had to wait to leave Sulzano. To go north it was ok, we “only” had to wait for 40 minutes (the train was actually at 10.40, not 10.20 as on the timetable ). But the queue to go to Iseo and Brescia was crazy. Why can’t you arrange more trains when you know that there are so many people that want to leave the town? I felt like the whole thing was really badly organized.

Maybe they weren’t expecting so many people, but they could have done something to improve the situation. They could at least have avoided more waiting for those that wanted to leave this unrepeatable (because it’s extremely exciting or extremely tiring, it’s up to you) experience, the Floating Piers.

Grandparents

Grandparents

This blog was meant to be about travel, but this morning I went to visit my grandparents, and I keep thinking about them.

Copia di me noni

I spied on them from the window of their kitchen. Grandma was reading the newspapers with her glasses on and a magnifier glass too. Grandpa spent about 5 minutes trying to put the handkerchief back into his pocket.

They have both lost most of their sight and hearing; their movements are slow, like those of a newborn, and in the same way they arouse empathy.

I remember I used to hide here in the afternoon, because my mum wouldn’t let me watch my favorite cartoon; grandma made the sweetest tea for me and served it with cookies, my mid-afternoon “merenda”.

I miss my grandpa’s strength and grandma’s talking, but now it’s my turn to give the love and protection I received.