Get a site
[:en]Walking in Shiraz[:it]Passeggiando per Shiraz[:]

[:en]Walking in Shiraz[:it]Passeggiando per Shiraz[:]

[:en]

It’s raining in Shiraz. In floods. I hope it will quiet down, otherwise we won’t be able to see anything of this town. It rained all night. In the guesthouse, there’s a sheet covering the courtyard where we have breakfast, and from time to time a drop falls into your head while you’re eating.

13h20 Seray-e Mehr Teahouse & Restaurant

Luckily the rain slowed down a bit and we made it to the bazaar and we are now having lunch at this beautiful teahouse hidden in the maze of the bazaar.

My eggplant dish was less tasty than usual; Luca’s chicken with rice and pomegranate was delicious.

We met some lovely people here in Shiraz. We were walking in the street and I stopped to photograph a door at the end of the alley, and the owner of the house I’m photographing walks by; he had gone to buy some bread and invited us for a chai. It was a bit embarrassing, because neither him nor his son could speak English. But we did manage to communicate, somehow. Bread and cheese, oranges, fruits similar to jujube. The room where we were sitting on the floor, displayed a fridge, some mattresses piled along a wall, a wardrobe and a carpet that covered the concrete floor. At one point they showed us the rest of the house. There was a room where they were weaving a carpet (finally we understood what earlier they tried to explain to us) and a beautiful mirrors room. Everything was falling apart, but it was stunning in its decadence. I hope they’ll find the money to refurbish, so they can make some money with tourism.

Shiraz

Walking around Shiraz after the rain

21h14 We are at the hotel. Luca is exchanging glances with two girls behind his shoulders, both having dinner with their partner, but it looks like this is not a problem. After the afternoon nap we went back to the street. We visited the castle, the Hammam, another mosque, a bazaar, the bus station to buy the bus ticket to Isfahan for tomorrow night. The Taiwan girl found a taxi driver that can take us to Persepolis and Pesargade for 8 euro each. Great! We leave tomorrow 8.30 am. At the hotel they asked for 55 USD each for a similar tour. Yeek!

[:it]

A Shiraz piove. A secie roverse. Speriamo si calmi, altrimenti non riusciamo a vedere neanche la città, altro che Persepolis! È piovuto tutta la notte. C’è un telo che copre il cortile dove si fa colazione, e ogni tanto una goccia filtra.

13h20 Seray-e Mehr Teahouse & Restaurant

Per fortuna la pioggia si è calmata e siamo riusciti a venire al bazaar di Shiraz. Ora siamo in questa deliziosa teahouse nascosta nei meandri di questo labirinto.

Il mio piatto di melanzane era meno buono del solito; il pollo con riso e melograno di Luca invece era speciale.

Begli incontri a Shiraz. Mi sono fermata a fotografare una porta alla fine della stradina, e fatalità passa di lì il proprietario che era andato a comprare il pane e ci invita per un chai. È stato un po’ imbarazzante, perché né lui né il figlio parlavano inglese. Pane e formaggio, arance, frutti simili alle giuggiole. La sala dove ci hanno ospitati aveva un frigo, dei materassi accatastati su una parete, un armadio e un tappeto che copriva tutto il pavimento di cemento. A un certo punto ci hanno fatto vedere il resto della casa. C’era una stanza dove stanno fabbricando un tappeto (e così siamo finalmente riusciti a capire che quel che cercava di dirci prima è che lui fa tappeti), e una bellissima sala degli specchi. Tutto che sta cadendo a pezzi, ma bellissimo nella sua decadenza. Chissà che trovino i soldi per sistemare così si arricchiscono coi turisti.

Passeggiando per Shiraz

21h14 Siamo all’hotel. Luca è impegnato a scambiarsi sguardi con due ragazze alle sue spalle, entrambe accompagnate da un uomo, ma sembra che questo non sia un problema. Dopo riposino pomeridiano siamo tornati in strada. Al castello, all’Hammam, altra moschea, bazaar, stazione degli autobus a comprare biglietto per Isfahan per domani sera. La ragazza di Taiwan ha trovato un taxi che ci porta a Persepolis e Pesargade per 8 euro a testa circa, ottimo! Si parte domattina alle 8.30. Quelli dell’hotel volevano 55 dollari a testa per un tour simile. Yeek!

[:]

[:en]A day travel to Shiraz[:it]Un giorno di viaggio per Shiraz[:]

[:en]A day travel to Shiraz[:it]Un giorno di viaggio per Shiraz[:]

[:en]

Maybe it was better if we took a private car from Yazd to Shiraz, with a stop to visit Pesargade and Persepolis, that would have cost 110 USD, but would have saved us a day travel. If we had met someone else to share the car with, we would have done it; but we didn’t, so we are here waiting for the bus.

This morning we took a bus from Fahraj to Yazd, where we had to ask to two bus drivers how to get to the main bus station; one of the drivers got off the bus under the rain to stop another one that was leaving and explain the other driver where we needed to go. In any other country, we would probably have been told “Get a taxi if you don’t know how to get there”.

Breakfast, bus to Yazd, two buses to the Terminal (the long-run bus station), half an hour wait, and at 10.40am we leave. VIP bus with wide seats and TV just in front of us. Nice to watch a super-romantic movie where you can imagine kisses and hugs (just imagine, in Iran public display of affection is not allowed, not even on TV). Finally in Shiraz, at about 5pm.

I have seen few smartphones here in Iran, less than in the Dominican Republic or Tanzania. Probably because it’s not easy to find an Internet connection. Anyway, I’ve found out that a sim card with no Internet costs about 3 dollars, with internet 10; maybe it’s a bit expensive for the local wages, but the service is available.

Copia di per strada-2

“Pit-stop” along Iran’s roads

9.20 pm Niayesh Boutique Hotel. We got the last available room at the Niayesh, so maybe if we came by car and arrived at 7 pm (because you need at least 2 hours to visit Persepolis, plus Pesargade and the necropolis) we would have to look for another place. And it would have been a shame because the Niayesh is the only hotel in a traditional house here in Shiraz, a house with an inner courtyard surrounded by rooms. It’s a meeting point for tourists, so hopefully we’ll meet someone to go to Persepolis with, otherwise we’ll have to take the bus and it’s not easy, especially for Pesargade.

We had dinner at the restaurant of the hotel and it was delicious.

So we arrived in Shiraz at about 5 pm; the last hour on the bus from Yazd was cherished by the only person of mixed race seen so far, a 7 years old boy. When we arrived in Shiraz, we took bus 79 from the Terminal to the hotel. And the people on the bus started talking to us; they wanted to know where we come from and if we like Iran. It felt very different from other towns, you can tell this town is more open-minded, metropolitan. They suggested we went to hotel Shiraz, 5 stars. Maybe when we’ll be rich. An elder man got off the bus with us, payed for our fares and walked us to the hotel, stopping every 5 minutes to ask the direction to passers-by to make sure we were on the right way. Even when we saw the first signs of the hotel, he didn’t let us alone until we found the entrance. Crazy. Never witnessed a welcome like this.

As soon as we put our bags in the room and went to the toilet, we went to see the AMRAGH-E SHAH-E CHERAGH, a shrine where two brothers of Mir Ahmad are buried (or maybe it was the Boghe-ye Sanyed Mir Mohammad… never mind the name). It was a bit complicated to wear the chador, but the ladies at the entrance were very kind. We were taken to the “international relations” office, where we were offered a tea. Then we were accompanied to the two tombs. Walls and ceilings were covered with mosaics of mirrors. Separate entries for man and women, so Luca went in with his escort. Inside people were praying and crying to get rid of the pain caused by illnesses and concerns. Very touching. Other people were looking at their phone and making balls with their chewing gum. I had to leave my camera at the entrance, while Luca could take pictures with his phone. The girl that was my escort is a student at the Sociology University that once a week volunteers here. She explained that to pray you should take a small stone that you can find along the walls and put it on the floor; you should then try to touch it with your forehead, so the negative energies can exit your body and flow into the floor, while the positive ones go in. Allah has 1,000 and one name, all written in the Koran. Green is the color of Islam because Mohammed dressed in green, plus heaven will be all green, full of trees; gold is the other color of Islam, can’t remember why; blu also because it links don’t know what. A lady asked my young escort if she was married; she answered that no. She wants to finish uni first, but she is often asked that question; probably they’ve got a son of marriage age and she looks like she is a very good girl.

. Allah ha 1000 e uno nomi che sono scritti tutti nel Corano. Il verde è il colore dell’Islam perché Maometto vestiva di verde, + il paradiso sarà verde pieno di piante; l’oro è un altro colore dell’Islam perché boh, il blu perché collega non so che. Una signora ha chiesto alla mia giovane guida se è sposata; lei ha risposto di no. Vuole finire gli studi prima di sposarsi, ma le fanno spesso questa domanda; probabilmente hanno un figlio da sposare e lei sembra una brava ragazza.

[:it]

Sarebbe  stato meglio prendere un’auto privata da Yazd per venire a Shiraz, che si fermava a vedere Pesargade e Persepoli, sarebbe costata 110 USD ma avremmo risparmiato una giornata. Se avessimo trovato qualcun altro con cui dividere il costo l’avremmo fatto; invece siamo qui che aspettiamo il pullman. Con l’autobus alla fine siamo arrivati alle 5 del pomeriggio.

Dopo essere arrivati a Yazd, con l’autobus da Fahraj, abbiamo scomodato due autisti per farci dire come arrivare alla stazione dei pullman; uno è addirittura sceso dal suo bus per correre dietro a uno in partenza e spiegargli dove portarci. Sotto la pioggia. Fosse stato da un’altra parte ci avrebbero detto “Prendetevi un taxi se non sapete dove andare”.

Colazione, bus per Yazd, due bus per il Terminal (la stazione degli autobus a lunga percorrenza), mezz’ora di attesa, e si parte alle 10.40. Bus VIP con posti super-spaziosi e TV giusto davanti. Chissà che ci guardiamo un bel filmone romantico dove possiamo immaginare baci e abbracci (visto che in Iran non è ammessa l’espressione di affetto).

Ho visto pochi smartphone qui in Iran, meno che in Repubblica Dominicana o Tanzania. Sarà che non c’è internet ovunque? In realtà ho scoperto che una sim senza internet costa sui 3 dollari, con internet 10; magari costa un po’ troppo per uno di qua, ma il servizio c’è.

Copia di per strada-2

“Autogrill” lungo le strade dell’Iran

21h20 Al Niayesh Boutique Hotel. Abbiamo preso l’ultima stanza libera al Niayesh, quindi magari se venivamo in auto e arrivavamo per le 7 (perché ci vogliono un paio d’ore solo per visitare Persepolis, più le necropoli e Pesargade) ci toccava cercare un altro posto. E sarebbe stato un peccato perché il Niayesh è l’unico hotel in una casa tradizionale, vale a dire una di quelle con il cortile interno e le stanze attorno. È un punto di ritrovo per turisti, quindi speriamo di trovare qualcuno con cui andare a Persepolis, altrimenti ci tocca prendere il bus  ed è un po’ più un casino, soprattutto per Pesergade.

Abbiamo cenato al ristorante dell’hotel ed era tutto buonissimo.

Quindi siamo arrivati a Shiraz verso le 5; l’ultima ora sul pullman da Yazd ci ha intrattenuti l’unico bimbo mulatto visto finora qui. Arrivati a Shiraz, abbiamo preso il bus 79 dal Terminal all’hotel. E subito la gente ha cominciato a parlarci; vogliono sapere da dove siamo e se ci piace l’Iran. Molto diverso dalle altre città, si vede che è una città più aperta, quasi metropolitana. Volevano mandarci all’hotel Shiraz. 5 stelle. Quando saremo ricchi magari. Un vecchietto è sceso dal bus con noi, ci ha pagato i biglietti e ci ha accompagnati all’hotel, fermandosi ogni 5 minuti per chiedere info ai negozianti ed essere sicuro che fossimo sulla giusta strada. Anche quando abbiamo visto le prime indicazioni per l’hotel, non ci ha lasciati finché non abbiamo trovato l’entrata. Boh. Io non ho mai visto cose del genere.

Appena messe giù le valigie e fatta la pipì siamo stati a vedere l’AMRAGH-E SHAH-E CHERAGH, uno “shrine” dove sono sepolti due fratelli di Mir Ahmad (o forse è il Boghe-ye Sanyed Mir Mohammad). Un casino mettermi lo chador, ma sono stati molto gentili. Ci hanno accompagnati all’ufficio “relazioni internazionali” dove ci hanno offerto il tè. Poi ci hanno accompagnati alle due tombe. Mura e soffitti ricoperti di pezzetti di specchio. Entrate separate per maschi e femmine, Luca è andato per conto suo con il suo accompagnatore. Dentro la gente pregava e piangeva per sfogarsi del dolore causato da malanni e preoccupazioni. Molto toccante. Altri invece guardavano il telefono e facevano le bolle con la gomma da masticare. A me hanno fatto mettere giù la macchina fotografica all’entrata, mentre Luca ha fatto foto con il cellulare. La ragazza che mi accompagnava è una studentessa di sociologia che una volta a settimana fa la volontaria lì. Mi ha spiegato dei sassi che si mettono per terra e la fronte li deve toccare quando ci si piega per pregare, così le energie negative escono dal corpo e vanno sul pavimento, mentre qulle positive entrano. Allah ha 1000 e uno nomi che sono scritti tutti nel Corano. Il verde è il colore dell’Islam perché Maometto vestiva di verde, + il paradiso sarà verde pieno di piante; l’oro è un altro colore dell’Islam perché boh, il blu perché collega non so che. Una signora ha chiesto alla mia giovane guida se è sposata; lei ha risposto di no. Vuole finire gli studi prima di sposarsi, ma le fanno spesso questa domanda; probabilmente hanno un figlio da sposare e lei sembra una brava ragazza.

[:]

[:en]At the border with the desert[:it]Ai confini del deserto[:]

[:en]At the border with the desert[:it]Ai confini del deserto[:]

[:en]

Finally the desert.

Feb 17 2015, 9.30 am

We are sitting on the cold roadside along the Silk Road Hotel, waiting for Masoud of the Fahreddinn that offered to take us to Fahraj. The german girls will stay another day, we will meet them again in Shiraz. We are right in the middle of our trip.

10.50 am. At the end we asked the hotel to call Masoud, and he sent us a driver. We could have gone to Fahraj by bus, but it seemed offensive not to take the lift. He did offer it.

The roads out of town have 2 or 3 lanes on each direction, even though there’s not much traffic, and between the two directions there are about 50 meters, so it’s difficult to see accidents here (they do have the habit to spend a long time on the opposite lane when they overtake); they can do it, there’s a lot of space, there’s the desert around.

Between a town and another desert. Only near the towns, where water arrives through the qonat (a water system that apparently is quite expensive, so they’re trying to substitute it), there are trees and some cultivation. Everything else is sand, rocks and some bush.

Passeggiando per Fahraj

A walk in Fahraj

1.20 pm Haven’t seen Mr. Masoud yet. I’m starting to think we will never see him. His factotum has arrived, he’s making some tea. We are relaxing and waiting that the heat goes down a bit. Bahadur told us a few months ago a “Luca” passed by: he’s touring the world on a vespa. You can follow him on ilgirodelmondoa80allora.com. That sounds so cool! I would also love to do something similar. Italy-Turkey on a motorbike would be enough for me.

Nel deserto

Desert in Fahraj

7.23 pm. Bahadur is making dinner. He truly does everything here. He took us to the desert for a safari, we had tea and homemade grappa on the dunes, and smoked from a water pipe.

Bahadur told us that some of his friends would like to move abroad; but he talks to foreigners quite often, and knows that life abroad is not as shiny as you might think, he’s got a girlfriend and so he’s ok, he goes to the desert with his grappa so he can drink alcool when he likes; he’s happy with his life.

Before going to the desert we walked around Fahraj; the mosque was built 1400 years ago, it’s one of the oldest in Iran, and it’s made of sun-cooked bricks. The old part of Fahraj is made of sand and clay, like Yazd. The local restaurant at 7.15 pm was closed, so Bahadur cooked some spaghetti for us.

Over-cooked spaghetti with very oily sauce made of mushrooms, meat and tomato. And put into the oven. A bit heavy for a dinner, but not bad.

[:it]

17feb ore 9.30 circa

Siamo seduti sul freddo ciglio della strada fuori dal Silk Road Hotel ad aspettare Masoud del Fahreddinn che si è offerto di venire a prenderci da Fahraj. Le tedesche strane restano un altro giorno, le troveremo domani a Shiraz. Siamo a metà vacanza.

10h50 Alla fine abbiamo fatto chiamare dall’hotel e ci hanno dato l’autista per venire qui. Vabbè. Io sarei venuta a Fahraj anche in bus, ma a sto punto mi sembrava di offendere a rifiutare il passaggio. In fondo si è offerto lui.

Le strade fuori città hanno 2 o 3 corsie per direzione, nonostante non ci sia molto traffico, e tra una direzione e l’altra ci sono circa 50 metri, così non si scontrano (hanno un po’ l’abitudine di stare a lungo sulla corsia del senso opposto per sorpassare); tanto c’è spazio, c’è il deserto attorno.

Tra un paese e l’altro deserto. Solo nelle vicinanze dei centri abitati, dove arriva l’acqua tramite i qonat (un sistema di acquedotto che però sembra essere un po’ costoso e quindi un po’ alla volta stanno cercando di sostituirlo), ci sono poche piante e qualche rara coltivazione. Per il resto solo sabbia, roccia e qualche arbusto.

Passeggiando per Fahraj

Passeggiando per Fahraj

13h20 Il Signor Masoud ancora non s’è visto. Probabilmente non lo vedremo mai. E’ arrivato il suo aiutante che è andato a farci il tè. Stiamo riposando un po’ e aspettando che si faccia meno caldo. Bahadur ci ha raccontato che qualche mese fa è passato di qui un certo Luca, che sta facendo il giro del mondo in vespa. Lo si può seguire su ilgirodelmondoa80allora.com . Fico. Anche a me piacerebbe un giro del genere. Mi basterebbe arrivare in Turchia in moto.

Nel deserto

Nel deserto

19h23 Bahadur ora ci sta preparando la cena. E’ l’uomo tuttofare. Ci ha portati nel deserto a fare le buride (jimkane: paura!), ci ha preparato il tè e il narguilè e un bicchierino di grappa.

Bahadur ci ha raccontato che alcuni suoi amici dicono che vorrebbero trasferirsi all’estero; ma lui che ha parlato con gli stranieri e sa che la vita altrove non è che sia rose e fiori, che ha una morosa con cui ogni tanto fa trombetta e allora è a posto, che va nel deserto con la sua grappa quindi alcool ne beve quando vuole, sta bene qui.

La moschea di Fahraj che siamo tornati a vedere nel pomeriggio ha 1400 anni, una delle più vecchie dell’Iran, ed è fatta di mattoni cotti al sole. Tutta la parte vecchia di Fahraj è di sabbia e argilla, come Yazd. Al ristorante del paese alle 19.15 non avevano già più niente da mangiare e allora Bahadur ci prepara gli spaghetti.

Spaghetti stra-cotti con sugo super-olioso di funghi, carne e pomodoro. Messi in forno anche. Un po’ pesantini ma non male dai.

[:]

[:en]Around Yazd[:it]In giro per Yazd[:]

[:en]Around Yazd[:it]In giro per Yazd[:]

[:en]

13h33

This morning we visited the Zoroastrian temple Ateshkadeh here in Yazd, one of the most important in Iran. A part from the garden and a room with a fire continuously on since 460 AD, there’s not much to see. On a bench of the garden we took a couple of pictures with some local ladies… or so we thought! The husband in reality was able to zoom the mobile phone camera and only captured Luca and I, leaving out the two ladies. Shame. I thought he wouldn’t mind because he was the one who asked to take pictures of the four of us. But he kept the good ones for himself.

Tempio Zoroastriano

Tempio Zoroastriano

 

Amir Chakmaq Square

Later we went to Amir Chakmaq square and its complex: a mosque, the Hosseinieh (so are called the buildings that commemorate an Imam), a small swimming pool with no water and a qanat (a well of the particular Iranian water system) that is now a gym (there are also some shows with bodybuilders from time to time).

Below the Hosseinieh there are some small shops. Among them a kebab restaurant, specialized in sheep heart and liver. Here we had lunch with the above mentioned skewers and dazi (but the one we had in Kashan was much better), a stop at a pastry shop and then quickly to the hotel because I needed the toilet.

This morning I bought a hejab, that scarf that covers your forehead and goes below the chin, covering the ears too,because the scarf that I was using to cover my hair keeps falling down and I have to check it all the time. Because I don’t know how people could react if my scarf fell in the middle of the crowd. Probably they wouldn’t be shocked, but annoyed yes. Better not to run the risk.

 

Piazza Amir Chakmaq

Piazza Amir Chakmaq

 

Yazd Old Town

After the coffee we walked around the old town of Yazd, made of clay and straw. The base of the walls is clay bricks, that are covered with a mixture of clay and straw instead of mortar.

Walking around these little alleys is magical. They are very narrow and still you can find a car sometimes; I don’t know how they can drive here, I would rather walk all the time.

Città vecchia di Yazd

Yazd Old Town

 

All houses are surrounded by walls about 2-3 meters high, so you walk this alleys between walls. We visited a traditional house (pretty, but after what we saw in Kashan, we weren’t really impressed), Alexander prisons (and we drank a tea in the well where worst prisoners were kept), we got lost, we paid one euro to go up to a roof where there’s a small café and an art gallery selling two cups and a bowl, just to take two (horrible) pictures. Then a tour of the bazaar and dinner at the Hosseinieh again, with kitchen and more skewers because Luca didn’t want to have dinner again at the guesthouse (here many hotels are also good restaurants with local cuisine).

Incredible little town this Yazd.

[:it]

13h33

Stamattina siamo stati al tempio Zoroastriano ATESHKADEH qua a Yazd, uno dei più importanti dell’Iran. A parte il giardino e una sala con un fuocherello acceso ininterrottamente dal 460 d.C. non c’è molto da vedere. Su una panchina del giardino abbiamo fatto delle foto con un paio di donne del posto; o almeno così pensavamo! Invece il marito che ha scattato è riuscito a trovare il modo di zoomare sul telefono di Luca, e ha inquadrato solo noi due, tagliando fuori le due donne. Furbo.

 

Tempio Zoroastriano

Tempio Zoroastriano

 

Piazza Amir Chakmaq, Yazd

Dopo il tempio siamo passati a Piazza Amir Chakmaq e relativo complesso: moschea, Hosseinieh (così si chiamano gli edifici usati per commemorare un Imam), piscinetta senz’acqua e qanat (un pozzo usato nel particolare sistema di irrigazione iraniano) ora diventato palestra (ci sono anche degli spettacolini dei bodybuilder ogni tanto). Sotto l’Hosseinieh ci sono delle botteghette, tra cui un kebabbaro specializzato in cuore e fegato di pecora. Quindi pranzo a base di spiedini di cui sopra e dazi (però quello di Kashan era molto più buono), salto in pasticceria e poi di corsa in hotel ché me la stavo facendo addosso.

Mi sono comprata un hejab stamattina, quel foulard che passa sopra alla fronte e sotto il mento, tenendo coperte anche le orecchie, perché la sciarpa che devo sempre tenere a coprirmi i capelli cade in continuazione e devo sempre star lì a controllarla. Perché non so come potrebbe reagire la gente. Non credo si scandalizzerebbe a vedermi i capelli, ma potrebbe infastidirsi. Meglio non rischiare.

 

Piazza Amir Chakmaq

Piazza Amir Chakmaq

 

Città vecchia di Yazd

Dopo il caffè siamo stati in giro per la città vecchia, che è fatta di argilla e paglia. La base dei muri è fatta di mattoni di argilla, che poi sono coperti con questo miscuglio di argilla e paglia anziché malta. Bello passeggiare tra queste viette suggestive. Sono strettissime eppure occasionalmente passa un’automobile; non so come facciano, io piuttosto di fare quella fatica vado a piedi.

 

Città vecchia di Yazd

Città vecchia di Yazd

 

Le case sono tutte circondate da mura alte 2-3 metri, quindi si cammina tra questi vicoli in mezzo alle mura. Siamo stati a vedere una casa tradizionale (carina, ma dopo quelle di Kashan siamo rimasti poco entusiasmati), le prigioni di Alessandro (e abbiamo bevuto un tè nel pozzo dove tenevano i prigionieri puniti più gravemente), ci siamo persi per le vie, abbiamo pagato un euro per salire sul tetto di un edificio dove ci sono un baretto e un’art gallery con in vendita due tazze e una ciotola, per fare due foto che son venute schifo. Poi un giretto al bazaar e cena sotto all’Hosseinieh di nuovo con pollo e altri spiedini perché Luca non voleva cenare all’hotel/ostello di nuovo (qui molti hotel hanno anche un buon ristorante con cucina tradizionale).

Deliziosa cittadina questa Yazd.[:]

Verso Yazd

9h30. Siamo in autostrada che aspettiamo una corriera partita da Tehran che passi per Yazd. Non ce ne sono molte purtroppo. Probabilmente la prima sarà verso le 11. Passano molte corriere, ma vanno tutte ad Isfahan. Che stupida, dovevo informarmi meglio ieri sera, avremmo potuto prendere il treno delle 8 per Yazd, perché così perdiamo la giornata (sono 4 ore e mezza di strada poi). A Tehran abbiamo fatto così presto a prendere la corriera, non siamo nemmeno entrati alla stazione di E-Jonub, ci hanno presi su per strada, perciò pensavo che fosse così anche per Yazd. Invece tutti i pullman vanno a Isfahan. E pensare che avevo letto nella guida che è sempre meglio informarsi prima per i bus!

13h. Siamo fermi ad un “autogrill”. Il nostro pullman è arrivato verso le 11.30, per fortuna! Un po’ scassato, rispetto a quello usato per venire a Kashan. E sempre caldissimo.

I bagni qui sono puliti, non me l’aspettavo. C’è un telo che nasconde l’entrata, così le donne possono togliersi lo chador per andare a pisciare. Lo mettono soprattutto se devono viaggiare o andare al bazaar. Luca è incazzatissimo perché gli ho finito il caffè. Sempre quello solubile, e dolcissimo. Io mi sono dimenticata di chiedergli se ne voleva ancora, ma lui è troppo lento a bere! Saremo a Yazd verso le 4 credo.

19h40 Siamo al Silk Road Hotel di Yazd che aspettiamo la cena. La camera è brutta rispetto all’Ehsan House di Kashan, ma ci costa solo 30 euro (per due, colazione inclusa). Alla fine i 500.000 RIL che ho trovato ier per strada li ho usati per comprarmi uno scamiciato per andare in giro, perché con il cappotto ho troppo caldo.

Montone anche stasera per cena (tra l’altro due giorni fa per strada ne abbiamo visto uno che era appena stato sgozzato, ancora si muoveva e rigoli di sangue scolavano lungo il marciapiede), chicken curry  e frappè di banana. Mi piacciono moltissimo le ceramiche che usano qui, tazze e ciotole.

Stiamo spendendo sui 60 euro al giorno, al di sotto dei 100 che avevamo in budget; bene!

Una signora tedesca mi ha chiesto di farle una foto. Lei e la sua amica (entrambe sui 50), con i foulard stile contadina degli anni 40 si stanno godendo moltissimo il viaggio in Iran. Da quel che ho capito sono anche particolarmente eccitate/ubriache perché qui c’è la birra, ma forse non hanno visto che è analcolica. Ci sono molti tedeschi che girano, forse perché in Germania non c’è la convinzione comune che l’Iran sia un posto pericoloso.

Alla fine siamo arrivati verso le 5 e abbiamo appena fatto in tempo a vedere la Masjed-e Jameh, la moschea che domina su Yazd. Bellissima anche di notte.

La moschea di Yazd

Masjed-e Jameh, la moschea di Yazd

Secondo giorno a Kashan

14 Febbraio 2015

7h50

Profumo di pane appena sfornato. Fanno questo pane rotondo del diametro di circa 50 cm, fino, cotto in un forno rotondo, con a volte dei semi di finocchio o sesamo, ne comprano 2 o 20 fette e se le portano in giro sottobraccio, senza sprechi di carta o plastica. Poi ce lo offrono a colazione o cena e a noi piace tanto. Per i panini del pranzo invece usano un pane tipo baguette, però morbido e ciungoso.

14h15 Siamo tornati all’hotel a bere un tè e riposare. Anche oggi abbiamo camminato i nostri chilometri. Siamo stati ai Fin’s Garden, Bagh-e Fin, Patrimonio Mondiale dell’UNESCO, dove c’è una sorgente d’acqua magica, perché non si capisce da dove venga. Qui Amir Kabir, un primo ministro un po’ scomodo, era stato prima segregato e poi ucciso, mentre si faceva il bagno nell’hammam. Mentre aspettavamo il bus per tornare in paese (i giardini sono a circa mezz’ora di bus) un negoziante mi ha regalato un profumetto orribile (va molto l’acqua di rosa qui, ma quella che mi è stata regalata dev’essere particolarmente vecchia) e in cambio mi ha chiesto una penna dell’Italia. In borsa avevo una dell’Istat, eredità del censimento, e gliel’ho regalata volentieri.

Fin Gardens

Fin Gardens

Tornati in paese una vecchietta che continuava a tenermi per mano voleva che prendessimo il taxi per andare al bazaar, mi sa che ci è rimasta male quando le ho detto che avremmo camminato; forse sperava di esserci utile. Al bazaar Ali (una specie di guida del bazaar; praticamente attacca i turisti e li porta a vedere le botteghe dei suoi “cugini”) ci fa vedere i tappeti del suo amico, il quale s’incazza quando viene a sapere che Ali ci stava offrendo i tappeti a 50 dollari, mentre costano 100. Forse Ali non sapeva che 50 è il prezzo per gli Iraniani; ma non credo; probabilmente l’amico voleva solo giocare al ribasso un po’. Ok. Comunque anche se fosse stato un prezzaccio è troppo presto per pensare a un tappeto, ce lo dovremmo portare in spalle per altri 10 giorni.

Moschea al Bazaar di Kashan

Moschea al Bazaar di Kashan

Ennesimo paninetto, questa volta coi wurstel, e poi qui, al nostro super tranquillo hotel, perché non ce la facevo più a camminare. Comunque fa caldissimo, non me l’aspettavo! Con il giubbotto invernale sto soffrendo e non me lo posso togliere perché ci vuole qualcosa che copra bene il sedere.

L'hammam di Kashan, stupendamente restaurato, è uno dei più belli dell'Iran

L’hammam di Kashan, stupendamente restaurato, è uno dei più belli dell’Iran

17h53 Siamo all’Abbasi traditional restaurant di Kashan. Abbiamo preso un mix coffee (caffè solubile, che a Luca piace tantissimo perché è super-dolce) e yoghurt intero con cocomero e cumino. Ora abbiamo ordinato Mossama Bademjan with Camel Meat (cammello con melanzane) e Abbasi Special Dizzi (montone, fagioli bianchi, ceci e cipolla). Ci costerà una fortuna, ma è San Valentino! <3

L’ABBASI è un’altra delle case tradizionali tipiche di Kashan. Prima siamo stati alla TABATABEI, con bellissimi stucchi e specchi; poi all’Hammam-e Sultan Mir Ahmad, un bagno turco molto bello, ricco di maioliche, stupendamente restaurato, è uno dei più belli dell’Iran; il tetto ha delle cupole parzialmente vetrate per far entrare la giusta quantità di luce. E infine qui, una casa tradizionale su 5-6 piani. Quasi tutte le case hanno dei lavori in corso. Del resto i muri sono di sabbia e paglia e gli stucchi sono molto delicati, hanno bisogno di costante restauro.

Qui con il tè (chai, come in India) o il caffè ti portano dei biscottini speziati o i datteri. A Tehran vedevo la gente prendersi dei datteri da vassoi all’entrata di alcuni negozi; pensavo stessero rubando, invece sono proprio offerti. Dove abbiamo cenato a Tehran c’erano dei cioccolatini buonissimi, che ci hanno offerto prima di cena.

Il Dizzi viene servito in una specie di zuppiera stretta ed alta; dentro ci sono la minestrina e la carne con i ceci. Si versa la minestrina in un piatto, mentre carne e ceci vengono pestati dentro la zuppiera. Alla fine l’impasto viene messo in un piatto e si mangia con il pane. Luca dice che non ha mai mangiato niente di più buono di quella minestrina di montone. Era tutto contento.

Abbasi House a Kashan

Abbasi house a Kashan

Abbiamo mangiato molto e tutto buonissimo, per il corrispondente di 10 euro. Non è niente, se pensiamo che in Italia non compriamo neanche una pizza per uno a 10 euro. Ma noi abbiamo un budget di 100 euro al giorno, e dobbiamo stare attenti a quel che spendiamo. Vabbè, è San Valentino, non sgarriamo ogni giorno. E poi per strada tornando verso la guesthouse ho trovato una banconota dello stesso importo… 10 euro, che qui ci sembrano 50!